What I love about England in the summer

Anyone who knows me well, knows that although I never had a problem with Minnesota winters (you can always put on more clothes) I had a real problem with Minnesota summers (you reach a limit where you can not take more clothes off!)  The heat, the humidity, the bugs.  The weather swings that can cause so much change in 24 hours that you have to check the weather on a twice-daily basis.  The likelihood of getting caught somewhere in clothes that were good for yesterday’s weather and are utterly diabolically wrong for today’s.

Although I have bugs here, I also have the following ten-day forecast:

Partly cloudy every day

High-low for each of the next nine days:

76-56

75-57

77-59

73-56

72-56

73-57

72-56

72-56

73-57

So bottom line, comfortable temperatures, sunshine, and no need to actually check the weather forecast on more than a weekly basis.  I’m in heaven.  Could someone please remind me why the English complain so much about the weather???

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7 responses to “What I love about England in the summer

  1. Did you forget to mention the rain, or did your forecast? The BBC 5 day forecast predicts heavy rain showers on Friday and light rain showers on Saturday.

    Perhaps you could post how the actual weather compares to the forecast.

    Oh, and perhaps you could drag yourself into the 21st century and post figures in C.

  2. The original forecast when I looked had partly cloudy every day and did not mention rain…

    The problem with C, and the reason that I don’t like it, is that each degree represents too large of a difference. Shrinking 32 to 98 into 0 to 37 just does not work in my head, no matter how hard I try! I am fiercely metric in my work but for temperatures I just cannot seem to make the switch. Ask me about how I cook everything at 200 because it’s the only temperature that I know corresponds to something reasonable…

  3. Where did you go to high school? I’m from Minnesota too!

  4. Osseo Sr. and Jr. high schools.

  5. Yes, I was going to suggest that this must not be the rainy season……

    And yes, Chris, look at any engineering scale. Accuracy increases if the range is larger. I6 is easier to see a precise reading for a patient’s body temp in Farenheit scale measured in tenths than it is to do so in Celsius, I’ve always found.

    Of course, I will never be able to “think C” in weather, because “zero” is the freezing point of water, and zero in real life is cold. Zero “C” simply is not cold, it is a January thaw.

  6. > Did you forget to mention the rain, or did your forecast? The BBC 5 day forecast
    > predicts heavy rain showers on Friday and light rain showers on Saturday.

    And the forecast has kept pushing back the date of this rain – I’m in a different part of the UK now – and heavy showers have still not occured, but are forecast today (Monday).

    Kurmudge Said:
    > Of course, I will never be able to “think C” in weather, because “zero” is the freezing
    > point of water, and zero in real life is cold. Zero “C” simply is not cold, it is a January
    > thaw.

    In the UK winter, Zero C is quite cold – and whether there will be ice on the roads – or the possibility of snow (and therefore traffic chaos) is an important question. I’m told some people think of winter temperatures in C, and summer temperatures in F. However as NFAH and Kurmudge point out – the UK never gets really cold when compared to northern USA.

  7. Kurmudge Says:

    > And yes, Chris, look at any engineering scale. Accuracy increases if the range is
    > larger.

    That’s not true – Celcius and Farenheight can both represent temperatures with arbitrary accuracy using fractions of a degree.

    If you round both C and F to integers, then they clearly have a different resolution – so don’t do that then. Even worse if you convert measurements rounded to the nearest C into measurements rounded to the nearest F (as the BBC weather forecast seems to do).

    > I6 is easier to see a precise reading for a patient’s body temp in Farenheit scale
    > measured in tenths than it is to do so in Celsius, I’ve always found.

    Interesting. This must be due to the physical spacing of the ticks on the scale, and the position of round numbers.

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