Vacation, Interrupted

I know I have been quite quiet lately. There is, of course, a good reason. And regular readers of this blog will have been able to guess what happened.

I went to the US for my usual August holiday, to see my friends and family in Minnesota and to go to the beach for the only proper holiday I take in any given year. (And even then I typically work at least 1.5 days per week because, well, that’s the nature of my job, it never stops, not even in a European August.) I managed to completely ruin all of my Minnesota plans by losing my wallet in the Milwaukee airport en route, and thus did not have a car and completely changed where I was staying and what I was doing. This was not all bad, I might add, as it contributed to the great vacation skill acquired on this trip: I learned to knit. But that is a story for another day. What is important for this story is that I was heading to the beach for two weeks of idyllic paradise and relaxation after what had been a somewhat discombobulating Minnesota experience.

Beach day 0: Pack my beach things into my beach friends’ car and drive from the DC area down to the North Carolina Outer Banks. Arrive late morning after an ungodly early start, have a nice beach arrival lunch, pick up the beach house keys and pack in to the beach house. After unloading and settling in, head for a walk (just a mile up the beach and back) and cook dinner.

Beach day 1: Have a nice long walk on the beach (3 miles up the beach and back) and food and etc.

Beach day 2: Have a long day on the beach, swim, surf. Happen to be sitting on the beach when an earthquake happens not far away, and totally feel it. Start to become aware that in addition to the earthquake, there might be hurricane trouble coming.

Beach day 3: Obsessively read weather.com and outer banks websites, knowing that the hurricane is coming. Try to enjoy the beach regardless, have another 6 mile beach walk. Total beach miles to date: 14.

Beach day 4: Awake to an impending sense of doom with regards to the hurricane. Read weather.com obsessively over coffee. Happen to be on the local website the moment the mandatory evacuation order is posted. Change out of PJs and pack out of beach house. Arrive back in DC area in early evening to prepare for hurricane.

(non)Beach day 5: Hurricane preparedness. Buy bottled water and canned goods.

(non)Beach day 6: Hurricane. Play board games and wait out the storm.

(non)Beach day 7: post-Hurricane. Go for a long walk in the sunshine, see many downed tree branches but otherwise feel as though the whole thing had not happened.

(non)Beach day 8: Waiting day. Spend the day working and regularly refreshing the Outer Banks news to see if there would be a resumption to beach 2011. Find out at 3 pm that vacationers will be allowed back at 10 am the following morning.

Beach day 9: Groundhog day. Take beach day 0 and repeat. Pack the car, drive 300 miles, have lunch while waiting for the all-clear to re-enter the beach house, pack in and settle in for a nice evening.

Beach day 10: Back to paradise, right? Except the beaches were closed to swimming due to trees and other debris. Long walk (6 miles) and dinner.

Beach day 11: repeat of beach day 10. Still no swimming, but lots of impressive driftwood, if by driftwood you mean entire trees littered along the beach. Another 6 miles of walking and documenting.

Beach day 12: Finally, some swimming.

Beach day 13: Swimming and another 6 mile walk. BUT time to start packing, as it’s over.

Beach day 14: Pack up and move out.

Total beach miles walked: 32. Not bad given the circumstances. Number of days spent in the Atlantic surf: 3. Pathetic for a two week holiday. Books read: 2. Far below the usual standard, but that’s because I spent four days transiting between DC and North Carolina. Not to mention all of the packing.

Silver lining: I had an adventure and have a story to tell. The beach where I was, in the northern Outer Banks near the Virginia border, was virtually unscathed. We had power at the beach when friends in Baltimore and Boston had none. I worked on my new-found knitting skill, which is, as I mentioned, a story for another day.

Moral of the story: Do not vacation in the outer banks if you are averse to hurricane evacuations. That’s two years in a row for me, Earl in 2010 and Irene in 2011. Earl was better timed, in that it was at the end of my two weeks, while Irene was as inconvenient as possible. But, she says as a scientist can only do, statistically I am unlikely to be this unlucky next year, after two forced evacuations in a row. Yes, the Outer Banks are totally worth the effort, and I will continue to take my holidays there. Hurricanes are just part of the adventure.

I’m back in England now, and the paperwork battles for my visa are now in full swing. This holiday was supposed to be the stress-free vacation before the paperwork storm, and it did not end up like that. First Milwaukee, then Irene. But I’m stuck with the mantra “anything that does not kill you can only make you stronger” and so here I go into the next phase of life. Wish me luck with the paperwork and hopefully my next beach vacation will involve 14 full days of beach bliss.

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6 responses to “Vacation, Interrupted

  1. The hurricane might have been good preparation for the visa application… You will need to be strong for that, I’m guessing.

  2. Good luck! love the Outer Banks – also always laugh when, on the drive down from DC, you see that first store over the Virginia border in North Carolina that sells fireworks and guns. Toto, you know you’re not in Kansas anymore…

  3. Good luck with the paperwork!

    And welcome to the knitting insanity! 🙂 Have you joined Ravelry.com yet?

  4. Looking forward to lunch! Let’s plan that soon!! Also, I was chased out of the Yucutan penninsula (in August) during Hurricane Dean…our flight took off, literally, as it was just hitting the shore in 50 mph winds. We missed the last week of our vacation, but, there’s always a risk…Sounds like yours was mostly a good time 🙂

  5. This is a belated reply to your immigration post. No expectations of you releasing it. I have just returned to England (Feb) after 42 yrs in US. I’m divorced, lost my job and came back. I cringe at the immigration here. So many just going on benefit. Today’s paper stated Labor hid from publication that poor Romanians and Bulgarians, poorly educated, were coming over and are continuing to come over here. 15% are on Benefit. Then there’s all the others on benefit, with housing. I cannot imagine anyone sane begrudging you your job. You are obviously talented and highly skilled and deserve to be allowed to stay. And you pay taxes! You know that housing costs are egregious here and the way I see it is that the poor are flocking in from all over – legally and illegally and collecting Benefits for which they have contributed nothing, and they take up space and cause further housing shortages. I did not expect to feel this way, but this country cannot keep on affording to support the poor from all over the EU on the backs of the British taxpayer indefintely. At some point the system will collapse under its own weight. Sad, so sad. If the Eurozone fails, and various countries default then who knows what will happen. Oh, forgot to note that the population in Romania and Bulagria is decliing, likewise the unemployment situation has improved while ours has gotten worse. The funny(?) part of all this, is that in the States I was a left leaning liberal and now I am way on the right but I haven’t changed. Oh dear….

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